BBC World Service

Business ServiceMarlin is the preeminent provider of credit products and services to small businesses nationwide, delivering exceptional value and service to our customers, creating a rewarding environment for our employees and generating superior returns for our shareholders. Stefan Metzger has over 20 years of experience in the IT industry with in-depth knowledge of the market in the areas of sales, business development, IT and process management, outsourcing and the insurance industry. He sits on the board of the Swiss Association of ICT providers (SWICO) and ICT Switzerland, the umbrella organization of the Swiss ICT-associations. Through this engagement, he shows his commitment to Switzerland as an important ICT location. He studied business economics at the ZHAW and holds an MBA from Henley Management College (UK).

This website exists to provide clients and potential clients with information concerning our firm and our unique, low-pressure approach to personal and professional services. We have an excellent client-retention rate, and we are extremely proud of the high-quality services that our firm provides.

Helping businesses get plugged in to a new neighborhood comes easy for office-relocation-service entrepreneurs who, as “locals,” know who’s who in providing such services as printing, restaurant delivery and equipment repair. As Dickson, a veteran entrepreneur, has found, determining if there is a market for your idea is essential before you roll it out. Otherwise, it’s easy to waste a lot of time and money on a product or service that no one wants.

IBM customers like the Australian Bureau of Statistics, which received a refund from IBM for botching an online census with naïve security advice, may not agree. Nor may marketing giant WPP, which has a colossal outsourcing deal with IBM but still succumbed to the NotPetya malware and experienced weeks of disruption as a result.

Adam Smith ‘s book The Wealth of Nations, published in Great Britain in 1776, distinguished between the outputs of what he termed “productive” and “unproductive” labor. The former, he stated, produced goods that could be stored after production and subsequently exchanged for money or other items of value. The latter, however useful or necessary, created services that perished at the time of production and therefore did not contribute to wealth. Building on this theme, French economist Jean-Baptiste Say argued that production and consumption were inseparable in services, coining the term “immaterial products” to describe them.